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Posts Tagged ‘john owen’

“Are you in depths and doubts, staggering and uncertain, not knowing what is your condition, nor whether you have any interest in the forgiveness that is of God? Are you tossed up and down between hopes and fears, and want peace, consolation and establishment? Why lie you upon your faces? Get up: watch, pray, fast, meditate, offer violence to your lusts and corruptions; fear not, startle not at their crying to be spared; press unto the throne of grace by prayer, supplications, importunities, restless requests— this is the way to take the kingdom of God. These are not peace, are not assurance, but they are part of the means God hath appointed for the attainment of them.”

John Owen, Exposition on Psalm 130

In other words,

Therefore, brothers, be all the more diligent to confirm your calling and election, for if you practice these qualities you will never fall.” (2 Peter 1:10, ESV)

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“Never let us reckon that our work in contending against sin, in crucifying, mortifying, and subduing of it, is at an end. The place of its habitation is unsearchable; and when we may think that we have thoroughly won the field, there is still some reserve remaining that we saw not, that we knew not of. Many conquerors have been ruined by their carelessness after a victory, and many have been spiritually wounded after great successes against this enemy. David was so; his great surprise into sin was after a long profession, manifold experiences of God, and watchful keeping himself from his iniquity. And hence, in part, has it come to pass that the profession of many has declined in their old age or riper time; which must more distinctly be spoken to afterward. They have given over the work of mortifying of sin before their work was at an end. There is no way for us to pursue sin in its unsearchable habitation but by being endless in our pursuit.”

–John Owen

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“The revelation made of Christ in the blessed gospel is far more excellent, more glorious, more filled with rays of divine wisdom and goodness than the whole creation, and the just comprehension of it, if attainable, can contain or afford. Without this knowledge, the mind of man, however priding itself in other inventions and discoveries, is wrapped up in darkness and confusion.

This revelation therefore deserves our deepest thoughts, the best of our meditations, and our utmost diligence and energy in them. For if our future blessedness shall consist in living where Christ lives, and beholding His glory, what better preparation can there be for it than a constant previous contemplation of that glory as revealed in the gospel, that by a view of it we may be gradually transformed into the same glory?” (John Owen, The Glory of Christ, p. 25-26)

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Here’s a rich quote from John Owen on Christ and your sin.

Tim Challies has been blogging on Modesty Matters: A couple of days ago I began a short series on modesty. It is not my intention that this series will say everything about modesty. Rather, I am trying to corral our thoughts and lead them in a specific direction and I think that direction will become clear today. I acknowledge in advance that this final entry in the series will inevitably be unsatisfying in some ways. But hang in there and I think you will see the value in thinking about modesty in this way. First, though, you may want to read The Heart of Modesty and Imperishable Beauty.

Erik serves us by reminding us that Prayer is for God, Yes, but it is also for us:  Drawing on Jonathan Edwards he says, “When we pray we are not to think that we are somehow informing God of his perfections, as if he was not aware of his prevailing holiness, goodness, justice, love, mercy, & all sufficiency! Nor are we telling God something he does not know in terms of our finiteness, dependence, and unworthiness that we might somehow convince God to do the things that we ask. But rather, prayer is used by God in the lives of believers to mold, prepare and affect the hearts of his children “with the things we express, and so to prepare us to receive the blessings we ask.”

Have you ever doubted and wondered Will God Be Faithful? Jonathan Holmes walks  us through Psalm 22 “which contains some of the most heart-wrenching cries to God recorded in all of the Psalms. God Himself is on trial and David asks, “Will God remain faithful?” This is the song of a believer who experiences great suffering and wonders where God is. It is a psalm that, in the midst of injustice, wonders if God Himself will be faithful to His promise.”

Finally Megan cautions us, “Don’t Tell Me Your Kid’s Sins.”:  When parents retell our children’s sins, we often leave the impression that we are the ones who have been wronged. This is not the attitude of Scripture. David’s confession in Psalm 51 makes it clear that sin is primarily rebellion against God himself. We parents may have been disrespected or disobeyed by our children, but we are not the chief offended party. We distract our children from the real significance of their sin—and the real sweetness of their Savior—when we make it sound like their sin is about us rather than about God.

 

 

 

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“To mortify a sin is not utterly to kill, root it out, and destroy it, that it should have no more hold at all nor residence in our hearts. It is true this is that which is aimed at; but this is not in this life to be accomplished. There is no man that truly sets himself to mortify any sin, but he aims at, intends, desires its utter destruction, that it should leave neither root nor fruit in the heart or life. He would so kill it that it should never move nor stir anymore, cry or call, seduce or tempt, to eternity. Its not-being is the thing aimed at. Now, though doubtless there may, by the Spirit and grace of Christ, a wonderful success and eminency of victory against any sin be attained, so that a man may have almost constant triumph over it, yet an utter killing and destruction of it, that it should not be, is not in this life to be expected.”

~John Owen~ Overcoming Sin & Temptation (Wheaton, IL; Crossway; 2006) p. 70-71.

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“By his cross, divine holiness and justice were exalted, and through his triumph, grace and mercy are poured out to the full. In glorious thoughts of this let my soul live, and in believing it let my soul die. And let the present wonder of this glory make way for the eternal enjoyment of it in its beauty and fullness.

One view of Christ’s glory by faith will scatter all the fears, answer all the objections and disperse all the depressions of poor, tempted, doubting souls. To all believers it is an anchor which they may cast within the veil, to hold them firm and steadfast in all trials, storms and temptations, both in life and in death.”

— John Owen
The Glory of Christ

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Don’t know how long any of these titles at these prices will last but check them out now:

Found: God’s Will by John MacArthur – $3.99

King Solomon: The Temptations of Money, Sex, and Power by Philip Ryken – $4.99

Overcoming Sin and Temptation by John Owen – $3.99

Preaching for God’s Glory by Alistair Begg – $3.99

The Grace of Repentance by Sinclair Ferguson – $3.99

In Christ Alone: Living the Gospel Centered Life by Sinclair Ferguson – 99¢

Justified by Faith Alone  by RC Sproul – $3.19

The Enemy Within: Straight Talk About the Power and Defeat of Sin by Kris Lungaard – $2.99

Practicing Affirmation by Sam Crabtree – $3.02

Set Apart: Calling a Worldly Church to a Godly Life by R. Kent Hughes – $2.99

Understanding the Big Picture of the Bible by Wayne Grudem and co – $2.99

Becoming God’s True Woman by Nancy Leigh DeMoss (Editor) – $2.99

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