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Posts Tagged ‘stewardship’

Randy Alcorn in a post called Depositing This Life in Eternity’s Account

One morning I was at a restaurant when a frazzled woman blew through the door and loudly complained to her friend, “The wipers aren’t working again on my Porsche, and the Audi’s in for repairs. I’ve had it!”

I smiled but at the same time was saddened for this poor woman. (Yes, poor woman.) What a contrast to the believer with eternal perspective:

I have learned to be content whatever the circumstances. I know what it is to be in need, and I know what it is to have plenty. I have learned the secret of being content in any and every situation, whether well fed or hungry, whether living in plenty or in want. I can do everything through him who gives me strength. (Philippians 4:11-13)

deposit-eternity

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Tim Challies wrote a short piece urging us to consider four questions before we make a purchase.  These four questions might go as far back as John Wesley (though they might be a paraphrase by now):

1. In spending this money, am I acting as if I own it, or am I acting as the Lord’s trustee?

2. What Scripture passage requires me to spend this money in this way?

3. Can I offer up this purchase as a sacrifice to the Lord?

4. Will God reward me for this expenditure at the resurrection of the just?

Tim elaborates and explains each one of these questions in 4 Questions To Ask Your Money.

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Paul recommends these resources (most of which I am familiar with):

BOOKS/BOOKLETS

AUDIO

More here

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John MacArthur asks a thoughtful question and then gives a surprising answer:

When you think about coming to church, what aspect do you look forward to the most?

For the sake of this discussion, let’s assume your answer is something spiritually noble—nothing vain or selfish like wanting people to see you dressed in your finest clothes, showing off a new car, or trying to sell goods or services to friends at church. Instead, let’s assume the best—that whatever it is you look forward to most is somehow related to ministry.

Some people might say the teaching keeps them coming back each week. Others would say the music. For some believers, it might be the deep relationships with other Christians they find through their churches—relationships that they can’t cultivate elsewhere. Others might just appreciate the temporary relief from the pressures of life, work, and the world.

But let me suggest something to you: If we really understand Scripture—particularly some specific promises from Jesus—the thing you should look forward to the most is the offering.

Keep reading “The Abundance of Giving” by John MacArthur as he explains why giving ought to excite us!

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Kevin DeYoung challenges us:

Do you want to be radical in your devotion to Christ? Do you want your life to count and not be a waste? Do you want to see the nations come to Christ and the world changed for the better?

Well, here’s one practical thing you can do right now on your way to those lofty ambitions: pay down your debt.

There are 610,000,000 credit cards in the United States, and every household with at least one carries an average debt of $16,000. Total U.S. consumer debt is more than $2.5 trillion. Think of all the money Christians have tied up in late fees and financial commitments that can’t be spent on the work of the gospel in the world.

How will you ever give sacrificially to your church if you are swamped in credit card debt? How can you even consider doing missions overseas if you’re swallowed up in student loans? What sort of flexibility will you have to go anywhere and do anything if your house is worth half of what you owe on your mortgage? What will you have to give to support a new church plant in your city or the crisis pregnancy center down the street or the seminary overseas if you have two car payments, two mortgages, and twenty thousand dollars in consumer debt?

I love the emphasis in our day on doing hard things. I love the passion for a big God and big causes. I love the gospel-centered enthusiasm and idealism. But more often than not new dreams don’t come true without old-fashioned virtues like temperance, frugality, and hard work. Heartfelt passion won’t change the world. But passion plus prudence plus perseverance just might.

So if you are serious about carrying your cross and giving your all to Jesus, you should take more seriously paying down all that you owe.

Read the rest here.

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This pastor makes some good observations about the Bible and finances

More than 2,000 Scripture verses deal with money and possessions. The way we manage money is fundamentally a spiritual matter (Luke 16:10-11). On top of this, consider the problems related to poor money management. In a recent survey 46% of Americans reported suffering from debt-related stress. Financial problems can lead to marital breakdowns and contribute to unethical behavior (Prov. 30:8-9).

It never ceases to amaze me that algebra is required in school but personal finance is not. We desperately need to hear what the Bible says about personal finance.

In Ephesians 4:28 Paul boils personal finance down to two points: Earning and spending. He does so not as a financial guru but as a pastor teaching believers how to “walk worthy of the calling with which [they] were called” (v. 1).

He goes on to make some simple and yet sound points regarding how we should earn money and spend it for God’s glory which you can read here.

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David Murray writes:

The most unbelieved beatitude in the Bible is: “It is more blessed to give than receive” (Acts 20:35). The giver happier than the getter? Surely some mistake? That goes against all our intuitions and instincts. So let me help you to believe it and act upon it by giving you ten reasons why it is more blessed to give than to receive.

  1. Giving obeys God’s command
  2. Giving submits to God’s Lordship
  3. Giving exhibits God’s heart
  4. Giving illustrates God’s salvation
  5. Giving trusts God’s provision
  6. Giving widens God’s smile
  7. Giving advances God’s kingdom
  8. Giving promotes God’s sanctifying of us
  9. Giving testifies to God’s power
  10. Giving praises God’s character

Read the full article over at Christianity.com.

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